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UER Forum > Rookie Forum > Beginner's tips and techniques (Viewed 6367 times)
jeepdave 


Location: Anderson, SC
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It's also a gun.

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Re: Beginner's tips and techniques
< Reply # 20 on 8/17/2015 5:14 PM >
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If you do manage to get caught your attitude will have far more to do with how the situation is handled. From Paul Blart to Officer Andy being respectful and not an idiot (hands not in pockets, speaking clearly, yes sir/mam and no sir/mam) will keep you out of jail/fines 90% of the time. Of course if you are hiding a dead hooker or smoking meth your results may vary.




Ezekiel 25:17
IndoAnomaly 


Location: Austin, TX
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Nothing to see here.

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Re: Beginner's tips and techniques
< Reply # 21 on 8/17/2015 5:35 PM >
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Posted by Bilvavi
One last thing comes to mind, comment and have a presence on UER and Flickr. Posting ans sharing pics (especially on Flickr) is your urbex resume. Even if the location wasn't earth shattering, the fact that you take a picture that you like and are willing to share it says something .


+1

When somebody reaches out to me for information the first thing I do is vet them. Flickr, Instagram, UER posts all play into that. Granted, not all explorers are photographers. I do take that with a grain of salt. But if people are active on UER and Flickr, I'm much more likely to help.




Every time you read this, I become more powerful.

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mookster 


Location: Oxford, UK
Gender: Male
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Re: Beginner's tips and techniques
< Reply # 22 on 8/17/2015 10:15 PM >
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Posted by jeepdave
If you do manage to get caught your attitude will have far more to do with how the situation is handled. From Paul Blart to Officer Andy being respectful and not an idiot (hands not in pockets, speaking clearly, yes sir/mam and no sir/mam) will keep you out of jail/fines 90% of the time. Of course if you are hiding a dead hooker or smoking meth your results may vary.


Definite wise words. Basically treat people how you'd want to be treated. Acting up to police or security who at the end of the day are just doing their job will win you no friends and likely make the unfortunate situation of being caught much worse. Even if they try and be a dick to you, remain calm and composed and don't rise to it, after all you know that all you have been doing is taking photos, nothing really bad. Be polite and compliant, if you are asked/told to leave do so without a fuss. Here in the UK trespass isn't a criminal offence however if you are asked or told to leave and you either refuse, or leave and then immediately re-enter the site, it becomes what is known as aggravated trespass which is a criminal offence you can be arrested for.




Deuterium 


Location: PNW
Gender: Male
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Re: Beginner's tips and techniques
< Reply # 23 on 8/21/2015 2:36 AM >
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Posted by Peptic Ulcer
Being new to this one of the biggest obstacles I encounter are the entry point to the building itself. There have been quite a few where they are completely boarded up and there are no other visible access points. With that being said I have 2 questions - one ethical the other technical.

1. Is it wrong (discounting the legal viewpoint) to remove or kick in the boarded up window/door etc.?

2. Is there an easy way to get around these? Ham fisted kicking is noisy, attracts attention and may allow entry later for those less scrupulous individuals. Removal presents many of the same problems even if you decide to put them back. Also it presents the problem of carrying around a crowbar and hammer which are obvious entry tools (another charge and a lot harder to talk your way out of that situation).

Any advice on this front is much appreciated.


I'm not going to take part in philosophical debate, but don't make it expensive for the owner. Out of town owners don't like getting calls from neighbors or the county asking them to clean up the trash or take care of gaping holes that tempt children. Even if the owner does not care one bit about the property and holding onto it just for the land, he would have to come clean it up or pay someone else to go clean it to avoid getting fines.



[last edit 8/21/2015 2:41 AM by Deuterium - edited 1 times]

Explorer Zero 


Total Likes: 2016 likes




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Re: Beginner's tips and techniques
< Reply # 24 on 8/22/2015 3:29 AM >
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good point, lots of municipalities force property owners to board and secure derelict buildings and or fine them

yes it becomes a philosophical controversial bailiwick and a lot of times kicking in stuff just isn't required, each to his own





Peptic Ulcer 


Location: Katy, TX
Gender: Male
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"Isn't it fun - being bad?"

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Re: Beginner's tips and techniques
< Reply # 25 on 8/22/2015 3:37 AM >
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Since the responses Ive been paying closer attention to boarded up windows. Most are screwed so then it becomes a risk reward situation with the variable of building condition to replace the board. So far only one site ive seen may be worth it but its on Homeland Security property and well patrolled. Hmmmm...great story and photos vs. Felony federal trespass? Still mulling this one over.




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Leopard18 


Location: Boston, MA
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Re: Beginner's tips and techniques
< Reply # 26 on 8/22/2015 3:51 AM >
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Posted by Peptic Ulcer
Since the responses Ive been paying closer attention to boarded up windows. Most are screwed so then it becomes a risk reward situation with the variable of building condition to replace the board.


If you are able, check closer around the buildings. Not always, but often you can find SOMETHING besides just screwed in boards. Sometimes all it takes is some creativity.




mookster 


Location: Oxford, UK
Gender: Male
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Re: Beginner's tips and techniques
< Reply # 27 on 8/22/2015 8:07 AM >
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Posted by Peptic Ulcer
Since the responses Ive been paying closer attention to boarded up windows. Most are screwed so then it becomes a risk reward situation with the variable of building condition to replace the board. So far only one site ive seen may be worth it but its on Homeland Security property and well patrolled. Hmmmm...great story and photos vs. Felony federal trespass? Still mulling this one over.


It's still not worth it to carry tools that will land you in hotter water if caught. How do you go about explaining screwdrivers and stuff in your possession if you get searched. Long story short, it's never worth it to actually, physically break into places, you contribute to the decline of buildings and may as well just go in to break things if thats your mindset. Look harder, and you will more than likely find a way in that doesn't need forcing. And if there isn't a way in, so what, it's not the end of the world. I've lost count of the amount of places I couldn't get into because there was no way in without forcing the issue.

And what if you remove a board but, as so often happens when places are closed, the window is intact and locked? A lot of the time they board intact windows to protect them from vandals, not necessarily because they are already broken.




Explorer Zero 


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Re: Beginner's tips and techniques
< Reply # 28 on 8/24/2015 8:55 PM >
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Different states in the U.S. treat "burglary tools" differently having been around cops a little while I can tell you in Texas just about anything can be a burglary tool given the right context and attitude so again hopefully we don't get side tracked on break-in techniques and tools so much as exploring techniques and reconnaissance techniques and just finding places to explore.

... what was I thinking ?




mookster 


Location: Oxford, UK
Gender: Male
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Re: Beginner's tips and techniques
< Reply # 29 on 8/24/2015 10:16 PM >
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Posted by 2Xplorations
Different states in the U.S. treat "burglary tools" differently having been around cops a little while I can tell you in Texas just about anything can be a burglary tool given the right context and attitude so again hopefully we don't get side tracked on break-in techniques and tools so much as exploring techniques and reconnaissance techniques and just finding places to explore.

... what was I thinking ?


Indeed. A hefty tripod could easily be seen as a 'tool' to break in to somewhere, going down that route.




TheSwanStation 


Location: Western New York
Gender: Male
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Re: Beginner's tips and techniques
< Reply # 30 on 8/25/2015 7:45 PM >
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Posted by mookster

And what if you remove a board but, as so often happens when places are closed, the window is intact and locked? A lot of the time they board intact windows to protect them from vandals, not necessarily because they are already broken.


Ran into this exact thing attempting to gain entry to a old nursing home last week. Found a board on the back that had been removed and set back in the window frame. Behind it was a screen and a locked, intact glass window. Whoever pried the board off had just wasted their time. After that we tried to get into a theater. Found a boarded up door on the side, I grabbed a side of the board and it fell off in my hand. I was excited until I realized it led nowhere.




Explorer Zero 


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Re: Beginner's tips and techniques
< Reply # 31 on 8/26/2015 4:15 PM >
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Besides using satellite imagery and Internet sources Ive found good places just by driving around. I don't mean driving around randomly in tract house neighborhoods or around the mall on the freeway. Narrow your search area down to older parts of town, industrial parts of town, look for water towers, smoke stacks, power substations, railroad spurs almost always something interesting nearby.

It helps having a buddy ride shotgun, many times my partner would yell out "hold it open door" or "back up lets check this place out" while I was dealing with traffic or dodging winos.

Sure some luck is involved. Anything wrong with that? Old For Sale For Lease signs can indicate an unwanted or forgotten site too.

Another quick tip; we used to see a local demolition company set up on a site a few days before the destruction began, not going to name names but every urban area has guys like them and often they do a preliminary walk around looking for anything they can salvage and where theyre gonna set up before the whole wrecking team moves in and often leave the place wide open. A dumpster with their name on it was like a neon sign saying come on in to us.




Explorer Zero 


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Re: Beginner's tips and techniques
< Reply # 32 on 9/1/2015 9:01 PM >
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another thread in the rookie forum made me thing about exploring in the darkness


no secret night time is my favorite time to explore, if I know where Im going not just exploring aimlessly around in the dark

for light take a small red LED type light, it doesn't alert bystanders like a zillion candle white light will and get one just bright enough to avoid the massive hole in the floor youre about to step in

Ive navigated lots of big dangerous places with a light no more powerful than a UER keychain light and red light doesn't burn up the chemicals in your eyes that enable night vision

give yourself 30min to get used to the darkness before you go in too far, youll be surprised how much moon light or starlight or city glow there usually is




Explorer Zero 


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Re: Beginner's tips and techniques
< Reply # 33 on 9/5/2015 8:46 PM >
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Where to park? Obviously this can either be of little concern or a major deal breaker depending on the location.

Some places even if theyre not right adjacent to the target will get you busted for no other reason than there IS no other reason to park there.

I like to park with other cars nearby, blend in, walk an extra block or four. It should be part of your scouting evaluation. Or just throw it in park and jump out with your camera like I have done a time or two!




Peptic Ulcer 


Location: Katy, TX
Gender: Male
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"Isn't it fun - being bad?"

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Re: Beginner's tips and techniques
< Reply # 34 on 9/5/2015 11:36 PM >
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Yeah parking is a tricky problem. My wife and I both drive expensive easily recognizable vehicles. I usually try the, "Oh Im not supposed to be here? I was just taking pictures" thing and its served me well. Being older and having a nice car can buy you some sympathy and understanding but there are some sites where it doesnt matter who you are, what you drive or how stupid you pretend to be - you get caught youre screwed.

The other downside to the nice car is that most locations ive been to are in sketchy parts of town and I feel rushed because im afraid its not going to be there when I get back...




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catdog23 


Location: Limestone City
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Re: Beginner's tips and techniques
< Reply # 35 on 9/6/2015 2:25 AM >
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One was to avoid problems with parking is to bike; it's always easy to conceal it, and if you do take a car it's a fast way to get from the parking spot to the location. I've biked over 60km just to get to some places (plus the return trip).




Explorer Zero 


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Re: Beginner's tips and techniques
< Reply # 36 on 9/7/2015 1:54 PM >
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+1 on the bicycle

in Dallas we used the public transit (DART) and walked to nearby targets, end of parking problem




JasonJacksonPhoto 


Location: VA
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Re: Beginner's tips and techniques
< Reply # 37 on 9/8/2015 12:18 AM >
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Posted by 2Xplorations
+1 on the bicycle

in Dallas we used the public transit (DART) and walked to nearby targets, end of parking problem


Biking is the way to go! I've gotten into several locations in sketchy neighborhoods by simply biking up to the building and stashing it somewhere out of sight. I also like the fact that my bicycle doesn't have a license plate so there's a smaller change of the police/property owners tracking me down after the fact.




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Aran 


Location: Madison, WI
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Huh. I guess covid made me a trendsetter.

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Re: Beginner's tips and techniques
< Reply # 38 on 9/8/2015 1:27 AM >
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Posted by JasonJacksonPhoto


Biking is the way to go! I've gotten into several locations in sketchy neighborhoods by simply biking up to the building and stashing it somewhere out of sight. I also like the fact that my bicycle doesn't have a license plate so there's a smaller change of the police/property owners tracking me down after the fact.


Not to mention, if you are in a wooded area or an area with lots of alleyways, you can take a bike through gaps where cars won't fit. That way, you have more escape options.




Indiana Jones wasn't an archaeologist, he was an urban explorer. Archaeologists do a lot less running and a lot more paperwork.

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TheSwanStation 


Location: Western New York
Gender: Male
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Re: Beginner's tips and techniques
< Reply # 39 on 9/9/2015 4:25 PM >
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Bikes are a great way to get to locations quicker and I think you stand out less on a bike than you do walking. Me and a friend have used bikes a couple times to get into a hospital that is in a very small town. Parking near this place is notoriously difficult because the town is very small and has no stores or public lots. No matter where you park you will stick out to anyone paying attention. The downside is you really need a truck to transport the bikes to a location.

On the topic of pickup trucks, they are great for more rural explorations. They blend in as many people in the country drive them. Not so good for a urban location though as it may look like you are a scrapper casing the place out.

Finding a place to park is always one of the most nerve racking parts for me. I will walk a few extra blocks if I can be sure the car is in a safe and inconspicuous place. Stores or restaurants are good, the bigger the better. Schools and public parks are excellent spots as well as mechanics shops, especially after hours.




UER Forum > Rookie Forum > Beginner's tips and techniques (Viewed 6367 times)
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