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UER Forum > Rookie Forum > Casing question (Viewed 1205 times)
aven134 


Location: Dallas, TX
Gender: Male
Total Likes: 28 likes




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Casing question
< on 7/10/2017 5:06 AM >
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Posted on Forum: UER Forum
So when you come across a building with most entrances/windows boarded up really well with masonry screws, what is usually behind them? Locked doors with glass panes, unlocked doors, empty door frame, broken glass windows, intact windows (boarded to protect from being broken) or something else? Asking for educational purposes of course




"If it's got tires or tits, it's gon' give you trouble!"
SorrySquad 


Location: Chicago
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Re: Casing question
< Reply # 1 on 7/10/2017 6:13 AM >
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All of the above.

Only way to know for sure is to get inside and see what the other side looks like.




DarkAngel 


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His operating system is unstable.

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Re: Casing question
< Reply # 2 on 7/10/2017 6:44 AM >
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Posted by SorrySquad
All of the above.

Only way to know for sure is to get inside and see what the other side looks like.


Pretty much this. If it's well secured, it's not usually worth the effort and obvious B&E charges if you get caught. Open door or whatever can just be trespassing. Making an opening turns it into B&E, which isn't worth the potential drama as an adult.

Hell, I've mounted oversized and framed plywood panels to walls before just to fuck with people trying to get in. Make the 'window' look easier to get into than the steel gate and they'll spend hours trying to pry off a sheet of plywood on a 1x1" frame. Only to find out that it was masonry bolted to a cinderblock wall.

God, I wish I could have heard their rage on that one lol.

But I'm an asshole and secure stuff well if I'm not going to be around for a while. (It was a business we were closing down and had to leave the bigger machinery in place until we could get a flat bed)



[last edit 7/10/2017 6:46 AM by DarkAngel - edited 1 times]

SorrySquad 


Location: Chicago
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Re: Casing question
< Reply # 3 on 7/10/2017 7:03 AM >
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Posted by DarkAngel
Hell, I've mounted oversized and framed plywood panels to walls before just to fuck with people trying to get in. Make the 'window' look easier to get into than the steel gate and they'll spend hours trying to pry off a sheet of plywood on a 1x1" frame. Only to find out that it was masonry bolted to a cinderblock wall.


Oh that brings back memories. In high school my buddy and I spent over an hour unscrewing stripped bolts and screws on a door frame to get into a prison's guard building (how naive I was), only to find that behind it was a bricked up door.

Talk about risk v award




EPOCH6 


Location: Fraser Valley, BC
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Re: Casing question
< Reply # 4 on 7/10/2017 3:51 PM >
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Posted by DarkAngel
Hell, I've mounted oversized and framed plywood panels to walls before just to fuck with people trying to get in. Make the 'window' look easier to get into than the steel gate and they'll spend hours trying to pry off a sheet of plywood on a 1x1" frame. Only to find out that it was masonry bolted to a cinderblock wall.

That's hilarious.

In my experience, whether a building is boarded up or not doesn't reveal much of anything about the interior. Types of fencing seem to be a bit more telling of what you'll find inside. Construction fencing seems to be put up to prevent pedestrian injury when the stripping/recycling process of a decommissioned building has begun, barbed wire fencing seems to suggest that equipment and/or belongings have been left behind. But at the same time we've all found many buildings with no fencing or boarding with plenty of equipment and personal belongings left behind, as well as buildings that are fenced and boarded with nothing at all inside. It's usually a gamble.




aven134 


Location: Dallas, TX
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Re: Casing question
< Reply # 5 on 7/10/2017 4:12 PM >
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Posted by EPOCH6

Types of fencing seem to be a bit more telling of what you'll find inside.



That's an interesting observation that I've never thought about. This particular building i'm looking at was sold to the bank after the owner realized he had too much invested. No fencing but the signage is still all there and there are a couple windows you can see inside of, window blinds are still up too and intact so it seems promising. I also believe there is machinery inside that is gigantic and over 50 years old, it is likely the building was built around it so i doubt it was removed.




"If it's got tires or tits, it's gon' give you trouble!"
Aran 


Location: Bozeman, MT
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Huh. I guess covid made me a trendsetter.

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Re: Casing question
< Reply # 6 on 7/11/2017 12:51 AM >
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In my experience, intact glass windows often suggests that the contents of the building are well preserved, if it's not empty. The windows are always the first to go in any abandonment, especially ones in urban areas. Broken windows are both a hazard and a potential POE, but that often means other people were there before you, and may have vandalized the interior as well.




"Sorry, I didn't know I'm not supposed to be here," he said, knowing full well he wasn't supposed to be there.

UER Forum > Rookie Forum > Casing question (Viewed 1205 times)


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